Sustainable Alternatives to Leather

Sustainable Alternatives to Leather

There are now several plants-based sustainable alternatives to leather. We  categorise many of these as vegan leather. However, vegan leather was first known as pleather. Furthermore, leather is plastic leather made from PVC (polyvinyl chloride), PU (polyurethane) or textile-polymer composite microfibres.

Let us look at 5 sustainable types of leather. Comprising three products that originate from waste materials.

1. Piñatex is a natural leather alternative made from pineapple leaves. Therefore, these waste cellulose fibres are ideal, requiring no need for more land, water or fertiliser.

2. Desserto makes leather from Nopal prickly pear cactus. This sturdy product meets rigorous Aeronautic and fashion industry standards.

3. Moreover, Nat-2 repurposes coffee grounds, coffee beans and coffee plants to make shoes. The natural coffee scent lasts through the production process.

4. Vegea makes leather from waste products leftover from winemaking such as grape peels and seeds. Hence, this leather smells like wine and comes in natural hues of wine such as blush, Bordeaux and burgundy.

5. Finally, Muskin is leather made from mushrooms. This leather is 100% biodegradable.

Which of these products would you try out?

Feature Image:

leather
Leather. Image: m0851 | Unsplash.

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