Plastic Alternative – Marinatex

Plastic Alternative – Marinatex

MarinaTex is an alternative to plastic film.  It is made from agar from red algae and proteins from fish processing waste.  MarinaTex is stronger than LDPE (commonly used in plastic bags) of the same thickness.  It is 100% biodegradable in a soil environment and can be composted at home in less than 6 weeks.

MarinaTex is still undergoing research and development.  With the right partners and guidance MarinaTex could be in production by 2021.  This incredible product takes into consideration the circular economy and the need to design out waste and maximise all the resources we have.

MarinaTex was chosen by James Dyson as the International Winner of the James Dyson Award 2019. We look forward to seeing this plastic alternative in our local shops.

Feature Image:

plastic alternative red algae
Red Algae. Image : kqedquest | (CC BY-NC 2.0) | Flickr

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